Wednesday, January 30, 2008

Nagoya Suzuki label














Their guitars have printed on the label 'est. 1887' but that date has more to do with their production of violins. The production of guitars seems to have started, like Kiso Suzuki Guitars, in the 1950's.

One reference says...
"Masakichi Suzuki was Japan's first violin producer. His father was a samurai moonlighter and made shamisens in Nagoya. Masakichi succeeded his father's craft business that soon failed. In the push for westernization in Meiji, he naturally became interested in shamisen's western counterpart: the violin. In the 1880s, he started to manually produce and sell violins. He founded the Suzuki Violin Factory in 1900. By 1910, his factory was producing 65,800 violins per year. Nagoya became the manufacturing center of string musical instruments...

Kiso Suzuki and Nagoya Suzuki were one company before the war. But after the war they were split up into the Suzuki Violin Company (now Kiso Suzuki Violin Company) and Suzuki Violin Manufacturing Company (now Nagoya Suzuki Violin Company). And there the relationship ended.

Both companies made guitars that commonly have a laminated back or sides, many times the top also is laminated, but the sound, playability, and volume are what makes them so popular. Both Suzukis used a very high grade of laminate and the construction usually shows a high degree of craftmanship.
Nagoya Suzuki made violins and mandolins, and is still in business making violins, but no guitars. They seem to have stopped making them around 1989.

Nagoya Suzuki had a 'Three S' brand of guitar that seems to be consistently very highly valued by everyone that owns one. They also produced an Insignia series of guitars in the 80's that had solid woods used in the manufacture and had more of an electric guitar-type of neck - thinner than a typical acoustic guitar.

There are thousands of players worldwide who would like to know more about their Suzuki guitar. It's a common story that when someone has G.A.S (Guitar Acquisition Syndrome) and needs to let a guitar or two go, the Suzuki is the one that stays behind and can't be replaced. Probably the skill acquired from violin-making and the other instruments played a large role in the good craftsmanship, according to one web source cited previously. It makes sense. Good wood, or good laminate, and good craftsmen, make a good guitar.

If you own a Nagoya Suzuki guitar- congratulations on what you probably already know - that you own a well-crafted and good sounding instrument. One that is still undervalued in the opinion of many players (in other words - a good buy). Maybe you'll hang on to it and see that there is something special about many of their instruments. In any case, as Tetsu said..."Have a nice life with Suzuki guitar."

68 comments:

markmyers said...

suzuki nagoya was responsible for the training of legendary master guitar luthier Sada Yairi.
He went on to make some of the best guitars ever made, in the tradition of CF Martin.
Some say they play and sound better than a martin.
He left the suzuki Company in 1929 to go it alone.
He may have been involved in the production of the earlier Suzuki guitars. Sada Yairi guitars were also made in Nagoya Japan, until about 1975, when he went bankrupt and was sold out to cheaper more commercial brands such as samick and the current korean S. Yairi brand, and the still japanese Yairi Gakki company. It was unfortunate to see the commercialisation of such a meticulous craftsman as Sada Yairi.

tomas said...

I bought a suzuki classical guitar in 1981, and it's probably one the finest guitars I've ever owned, not just in appearance which was great, but in playability. In those days, I bought it for $180.00, which probably equates to $300 - $400 now, considering $180 was about the average wage in new Zealand in 1981.

When I got together with other guitarists and played with them, my guitar always seemed much louder, it had a great full tone, I could always hear my guitar above everyone else's guitars, so could others. Others certainly enjoyed playing it.

It was a lovely looking guitar, with gold machine heads, well shaped headstock, and it seemed to be made out of darker wood than the average guitar of the time. It also had a thin black line running down the back of the waist, which usually indicated, I believe a well made guitar.

I bought an Ovation classical some years later, and despite the price difference, I would say the Ovation apart from its distinctive looks was no better than the suzuki.

Best

Richard Foreman

michael said...

I purchased my Suzuki Violin Company Acoustis Guitar no.700 for $50.00 a few years back from the Ballina Tip shop Australia. The dirt dust and grime was free.
With much care I re did the bridge which was off, fixed two broken internal struts, cleaned and oiled the machine heads carefully, new strings and wow! what a surprise.....a beautiful full clean tone which you just don't want to put down.
There is definately something very special about this instrument.......its extremely light weight but packs a big clean sound in all areas.
It's gorgeous to hear being played by good musicians and they love it...... many muso's often scratch their heads with wonderment at the guitars performance.

Montana Mama said...

My son rec'd a guitar can anyone tell me to find out the history-date on it:
Established 1887
Suzuki Guitar
No. 9
Suzuki Violin Co., LTD
Nagoya Japan

Thanks!
Montana Mama

billeboy said...

After reading the comments on this page I came across a Nagoya Suzuki on Ebay that no one else seemed interested in so got it for £50. I was told it hadn't been played for 35 years and certainly looked it.But even with old, tired strings and a covering of grime it sounded great. I am in the process of of de-gunging the fingerboard and filing 2mm off the saddle to improve the action. With a modicum of TLC it has come back to life and looks superb. Over the years I have played numerous makes of guitar - some ludicrously expensive but none better than this. A remarkable find and a definite keeper.

Judy said...

I have a Suzuki guitar which has the following inside...

Established 1887
Registered (X) Trademark (X=3 S's making a circle)
Suzuki
Guitar
No. 9
Suzuki Violin Co., LTD
Nagoya Japan

Inside at the neck is the serial number. It is 650125. This is almost in mint condition and has been kept in a hard case which is dirty but in great condition as well.

Anyone know the value?

kashianinks said...

Hi
I have a Suzuki Violin Company no.9. Was this guitar meant to be strung on steel or nylon? Anyone could help? Many thanks.

Stef said...

I just purchased a 2nd hand Nagoya Suzuki W-5025.
As far as dating is concerned:
I think the number on the neck block is the production date.
Mine sais: 770827, which IMHO sais it was produced on august 27, 1977. Same method as my old Hashimoto W350.
I am still working on the guitar ( cleanig, setting up) but on first impression it has quite a good balance, not too heavy bass, good wood working skills ( top is laminated, but very nicely done). I hope to post some more details and pictures soon.

James said...

kashianinks,
Please use nylon strings.

Alexander B. Krause said...

I own a Suzuki jazz guitar. It was purchased by my father approximately in the mid-sixties. It is labeled Suzuki Violin Co., Ltd. Nagoya and has the number P-15 stamped on the label. Its got a steel reinforced neck and open tuners, guess at least the top is solid. I learned my first chords on it the early seventies and after I started to play more seriously again after a break of twenty and more years I remembered it and picked it up yesterday from my parents attic. It has a lot of dings and dongs, however it was nearly in tune after all the years and with some cleaning of the fretboard and some new strings it should do its job again.

billeboy said...

You lucky boy! I have heard that the really good Suzukis are the jumbo flat tops and that their other products are unremarkable. Hmm...? I have a '72 classical model which I picked up for £50 in almost mint condition and while not the most responsive or sonorous instrument in the world it is one I play almost every day. I also have a '72Japanese Epiphone which is a superb guitar.I would very much like to play a Suzuki jazz guitar though.

n/a said...

Sorry everyone, I think I might have topped you all.
I have just purchased a very nice early '70's (my guess) Nagoya Suzuki (Model No. 700) classical guitar for the princely sum of $17.00 from The Salvation Army.
Some TLC and furniture polish has given new life to a beautiful instrument looking for love and willing to please (Hang on! I'm getting a little bit excited!!!)
Beautiful sound but the action will need some work. Can anyone wise me up as to what the wood on the back is? It's kind of a dirty brown/grey color with rivers and/or ripples through it and it smells like oak. Is it oak?
The top is of course spruce and is as mellow as my Grandmothers demeanor! Well, she's been dead for 30 years!!
I'm very pleased to join the Suziki club as my membership fee has been manna from heaven!
Yeeehaaaaaah!!

mickey said...

I have a Nagoya Suzuki model 7..the numbers stamped on the end of the heel reads 44.11.7 so does that mean it was made on the 7th November 1944 ? anybody know ? thanks , Mickey

mickey said...

On reflection re my previous comment about dating my Suzuki model 7 . If Suzuki didn't start manufacturing guitars 'til the 1950s then mine couldn't have been made in 1944 . So perhaps the number stamped on the block at the end of the heel inside means something else ?? the number on mine is 44.11.7

carl said...

I have a chance to purchase a late 80's? F-180 12 string, but have no idea on the value, anyone? I already own a #7.

Mike Paul said...

I bought a Suzuki F-120 12 string 5-6 years ago from a pawn shop. I love it. It is almost always guaranteed to surprise friends who play it because of its good tone, volume and playability. I paid $150 for it. I keep looking for some more information about it, but rarely run into anyone with a Suzuki 12 string. Anyone know more about Suzuki 12 string guitars?

Comp_wiz101 said...

l have a p15 in near mint shape . l bought it and a lap top at a flea market for 125 cnd. took it home did some tlc and it sounds wonderfull . first l have had. l play and collect and at one time had over 200 at home , l have had lots to compare with . its like ice raceing more bang for the buck . highly underated

Paul Junior said...

I was working in the D.C. area in the early 70's (Northern Virginia and Ocean City Maryland). I owned and played a 1957 D-28, D12-35, Ovations, etc. I wanted a classical guitar in order to get that authentic PP&M sound. At Washington Music Center in Wheaton, I played Goyas, Gianninis, Martins, and finally a very inexpensive Suzuki C-18. I had $1,000 cash and was prepared to spend it all on a really great guitar. The Martin was $900, but the Suzuki was stronger and more responsive with an impressive sound. For many years it was neglected without strings until recently. Its forty years old, with new strings, and I'm lovin' it:) More volumn, sustain, and resonance than any classical I have ever played...or heard!!!

Darrin said...

I have recently inherited a 1964 No. 7. After poking around on various forums I'm pretty excited to hear that these old Suzuki guitars sound and play better than their market value would indicate.

It also appears that there are a few others out there that have the same guitar.

I'm just getting my feet wet and my callouses formed and really don't have much experience to compare this guitar to others so I'd like to hear what people have to say about the Suzuki No.7

earl said...

hi,i found a suzuki guitar no.6 says,suzuki violin co.ltd,nagoya japan,it has circle of 3 s'es and has a number stamped inside#430601,i would like to know if this is a good guitar or not,i found it in a old house,it has no strings and no bridge or whatever that is called,the part at the bottom where the stings hook onto by the hole,otherwise good shape some scratches,would it be worth restoring?

mantagna3 said...

i have the cream of the crop, suzuki mahagany sides and back ,rosewood fretboard no3054 hardtop and a suzuki soft top no3067 nagoya its much lighter an narrower .lighter wood as i play classical music you have to give it a good twang to waken it. not sure when it was produced <hard top. maybe very early 70s 71 or 72 .get long notes because its on the heavy side .its well matured.soft top will not mature as much. cheaper wood not all guitars made are any good only the demonstration ones count .youtube steelback2 ps see the guitar.

huge said...

Hi... I have just purchased a suzuki classcal guitar No. S-31 made in Nagoya Japan. Anyone have any information about this model?. it sounds beautiful. So loud for such a light guitar.

Mark said...

Its great to hear about all the great suzuki guitars being enjoyed all over the world... unfortunately their is very little info on these babes. I doubt the dollar value of them will ever reflect the musical value of them, because the japanese guitar market is still grossly underated, and as you all can see, we can still pick them up for $50 bucks at the sunday markets. It onlt leaves one course of action... play and enjoy.

billeboy said...

Yep! Been playing mine this morning and thinking about the so called 'Golden Age Of Japanese Guitars' - the seventies. As well as my Suzuki classical I have a '72 Epiphone FT147 and a Grant Les Paul - both superb instruments that cost nowhere near their real worth. It seems I am becoming a collector of Japanese guitars.

Ali Bee said...

just bought a suzuki classical at a jumble sale for £1.00.It has the nagoya label and a number 15105. I'd be grateful if anyone has any info. It needs a good clean and set up and possibly new machine heads, though I will try to salvage them. Looks like the bargain of the year from what people have been saying. I cant wait to get it playable and find out what it sounds like.

raymond said...

hi my name is raymond I bought a suzuki guitar my question is what did i buy has suzuki voilin co ltd no.ad213 number inside neck 780825 nagoya japan also has suzuki three.s and the neck is kind of bowed

jordonsandner said...

Hey there everyone! Well, I just thought about looking at this guitar, since my father bought it for me a while back. It's a Suzuki No. 12. From what I hear, all these guitars are great, and I just so happen to be looking for a new acoustic. If anyone can help me out finding out any information on this it would be helpful. Jordonsandner@gmail.com Thanks!

KoriDee said...

i also have recently acquired a nagoya suzuki AD213S...serial #820714....which, from what i gather was made on july 14 1982...as with some of the others posted this one needs some tweaking to be in top shape, but the first thing i noticed after a set of Martin strings was how LOUD this thing is...oh ya, it was listed on kijiji for $20 CDN!!!!

Peterd said...

I just acquired a Suzuki classical in almost mint condition. The model is AD536S, Sounds great, but i cant find much info on that model...Anyone have any insight they can share?

grace said...

I have a Suzuki acoustic guitar no. 701. I've seen mention of the 700 model but never the 701. Can someone tell me about it's value? Thank you!

mallory said...

Hi, I have one too its a classical. No-32 700423. the bridge is coming off. It plays and sounds awsome, so i removed strings. Is it worth fixing and worth anything.

bcrbeast16 said...

Hey everyone...I'm just wondering...I have a Suzuki violin company classical guitar no. 6. It sounds beautiful when it's played. I'm just wondering if anyone knows what this guitar is worth.

mg81 said...

I have a suzuki guitar no.9 that my dad bought for $1 and spent $80 fixing. It may be beat up but sounds great. My guitar teacher even loves it sound.

the masked strangest seen said...

I purchased a Nayoga No. 32 for 20.00$ at a thrift shop about a year ago. Firstly because I needed a classical guitar for my collection { bass player by trade} secondly I noticed it was made in Japan and since I own a MIJ Fender jazz bass it just logically followed that the classical would be crafted just as well. I was right!! The body has a lot of dings and scratches but the sound and tone were and are unbelievable. Glad to see I am not alone regardless of price this is staying with me, eventually the truth will come out and the market will set it's own price list for these beauts of workmanship. If you own one , hold onto it, you never know>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

joachim said...

just bought a suzuki no 305..it sais it has steel reinforced neck but are set up with nylon..sound and plays great! it has no saddle bone at the bridge but is intonated perfectly?? even loooks like its supposed to be a bonething there because of a round deepening there?... love all vintage guitars..and I am from norway and has two veeery old hagsrtøms.. djisses...my martins cant compare,,,the gibson cant...only my (im shure of????) morena arctop from m,aybe from the 20- 30..it has a fretboard that looks like grey marmor,,the whole board! and some crazy cool abalone bindings across it..does anyone have or even seen such a guitar????? would be all ears:) best regards joachim

joachim said...

im nearly shure of being the only one having such a guitar????? been asking for years at sites...the morena no 50?? anyone heard of them?

M said...

Joacchim---- No need to feel too lonely--I have a Morena New Style no. 11.......

Cole said...

I've had this Suzuki guitar for years now since I got it from my Gramps. After talking to a friend of mine he got me interesting in finding out more about it, looked inside and the serial number is 490220. Sadly since my gramps has passed on, I can't ask him about how he got it. Over the years its seen some trouble, a missing knob and two missing strings. Though if it was fixed up, dusted, and given a clean up. I'm sure it would sound wonderful.

brent said...

This is going to sound really random but I jumped on this site to check out some info on a suzuki guitar that has come to me for repair, and i have noticed a blogger by the name of Thomas who signed off as Richard foreman. i went to school in the late 60's early 70's with a person of the same name. If some one or if this person can get in contact with me I would appreciate it as i would like to catch up with him.

mick said...

i just bought a suzuki classical guitar no 1663 suzuki violin co ltd nagoya japan another number at bottom of label rm 8308 and on the neck block inside 44. 12. 1 and then a 7 i .think
can anyone help with age? thanks mick

Clement said...

i just found a dusty suzuki no730.. anyone recommend for trade in or a rapair on it? cause the only thing is in good condition is the body.

Cathy O'C said...

Hi,
I have a Suzuki guitar from the late 60s or early 70s. Says Suzuki Violin Co, Nagoya. No 35. Can anyone tell me anything about it? Is it just a cheap guitar suitable to learn on or better then that. It's in good condition, just a few scratches on the bottom and back.
Thanks

Jessica Mayers said...

hello, i have a suzuki madolin model no. m-210 can anyone help me find out how much its worth?


number1godmom@gmail.com


jessica mayers

Get Yours said...

I bought a W-5025 in 1981, from a guy, sitting on the sidewalk and playing it for $100. Serial# 750804. (August 4th, 1975). He needed the money to get back to Canada.
I bought it because my all time favorite guitar, 1967 Martin D-35 was stolen and I wanted a guitar that I didn't care what happened to it and didn't need to be 'attached' to.
Well... 30+ years later, it is the only guitar that I play! I've had MANY great guitars since, including Martin, Gurian, Santa Cruz and others... Some have sounded much better than this Suzuki, but none have felt more comfortable.... I've owned three other Suzuki guitars, but I must have struck gold on the first one... Maybe as a payback for my D-35 loss.... I still think about 'the one that got away', but love my W-5025 as a dear friend with incredible memories....

Get Yours said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
MartinWhite1983 said...

Hi Micheal (and everyone). Just thought i would do some research on my Suzuki acoustic and when you mentioned you have number 700 i thought i would say that i have number 701! Probably a completely irrelevant peice of infomation but just seems funny how two guitars that may have been next to each other on the production line have ended up on opposite sides of the world! i live on the Isle of Wight which is on the south coast of the UK and my guitar was given to me by my grandad who purchased from new back in the 1960s (approx). anyway just thought i would add that useless peice of information. happy playing!

tomas said...

i have an f100 i bought in 1985 for £60 12string Suzuki tunes to C because of the tail piece more of the string is exposed across the guitar. To me it is the grand piano of all 12 strings and a nightmare to tune! However once in tune WOW! Large sound hole so it fills the room with sound. I also have a diamon pick up which fits the sound hole it came with the guitar. I don't use it at all i prefer to mike it up with a samsung compressor mike. The problem then is being consistent with your strikes when recording. I love it although i have bought a synergy ovation style 12 string lighter and brighter. Anyway D,Addario j38 light strings .010-.047 sound the best and they are long enough. I have many times tried other strings some expensive ones only to find out half way through that the bloody D + G string is too. Short! So i stick to D,Addario. Remember dont use a pick up on these acoustics use a mike . Play it safe...... Use a plectrum!!!! Keep it live (fingersfrench4u@hotmail.co.uk) laing french SOUPSON bandcamp.com/

scottishrogue said...

Hey everyone, I just purchased a Suzuki #32 (Nagoya) classical guitar at an eBay auction. I was the only bidder, and I'm looking forward to hearing the sound. The seller told me he knew nothing about guitars, when I inquired about possible cracks, and any evidence of the bridge lifting. When they try and sell a guitar without strings, I automatically wonder what are they trying to hide. I told him to send along a set of D'Addario ECG25 XL Chromes (flat wound) which is my preference for classical guitars. Judging from comments here, I might have struck gold (again) with this purchase. I certainly hope so! If this guitar sounds as good as my Martin 000C Nylon classical hybrid, I'll be VERY happy!

Unknown said...

I have had a Kiso Suzuki F-120 since 1986. My mother bought it around 1981 but moved to classical soon after. The intonation is not great on the higher frets, but it sounds great in the open position. It's my favourite guitar. OK, I only own two (the other is a G&L Climax - an underrated model if ever there was one), but the Suzuki is the favourite.
I still have the original hard case, and the guitar is in amazing condition for the age. I play it nearly every day :)

James L. Gibbs said...

I have a Suzuki Nagoya W-300 very decorated guitar looks like a Martin D series. It was tucked away in he closet for about 18 years and I finally had it repaired by Bert guitar a Luthier in Georgia that my friend Sterling Edwards has been friends with for years. After $750.00 of repairs neck binding, fret job and Elixir stings it sounds great. I k now it is from the 70's just not sure what year anyone know how to tell serial N0 is 780518 does that mean 1978? jameslowellgibbs@yahoo.com.

Victor Artigas said...

I own a Nagoya Suzuki No.32...anyone knows when these guitars were built ? I got it some time between 67-1970 when in college...

Victor F Artigas

Thanks !!

Victor Artigas said...

I own a Nagoya Suzuki guitar N.32..anyone knows when these guitars (year) were made ? I bought it sometime between late 60's or early 1970... Thanks

Victor Artigas

Shad Jarvis said...

Are the back/sides of a Suzuki 3s gr-20 solid Brazilian rosewood or laminate?

Victor Artigas said...

Can't be totally sure but looking at the sound hole the top part of the guitar appear to be a single piece of wood...as to the back the outside looks different from the inside might be laminated...but again I am not good at this sort of things....Thanks so much for getting back !

Victor

Sarah said...

Hi! I have a Nagoya Suzuki SD330 acoustic guitar. but I know nothing about this model. on the internet I have found nothing about this guitar.
Does anyone of you with this model? I'm from Germany, sorry for my english;)

e43fdd42-3c40-11e3-ba15-000bcdcb5194 said...

Hello guitar lovers! I am not sure if here is suitable place for me to write following things(if not, please delete my post)...

I own a vintage Nagoya Suzuki classical guitar no.34(40 years old) in good condition. If someone is interested in buying it, please contact me; docwindie at aol.com

Price 120 euros + shipping cost.

bcrbeast16 said...

Hey everyone I just wanted to ask for some help finding some information. I have a Suzuki Violin Company No. 6 classical guitar that I know NOTHING about. Can anyone help me out here? I have tried the internet for 7 years and I can't seem to find anything about it. It also says Nagoya, Japan...anyone know where I can find the production date?

bcrbeast16 said...

Inside on the neck there's a six digit number 430731...what does this mean...

disturbed_fan_kristy said...

Someone we had staying with us left his guitar and now I've claimed it. It is a Suzuki Nagoya with three S's creating like a flower look. The model is SF335MB and the label says established 1887. I would like any information you can give me about the guitar, it is in near mint condition, I am currently looking for a new bag for it. Thanks for your help :)

bcrbeast16 said...

Look inside the guitar towards the neck. Apparently the stamp in there is the production date.

bcrbeast16 said...

Finally someone that found a guitar like mine! After seven years of research bud I'm still dumbfounded. I still don't know what I have. And I find Suzuki didn't keep very good records of this guitar online apparently. That's about all I can help you with for now. Keep in touch. Maybe we can both help each other out!

bcrbeast16 said...

Look at the headstock. If there is three rollers for strings in one hole type thing its a classical. If the tuning pegs just pop out of the wood its for steel strings.

Miss Gertrude said...

I found a Suzuki Acoustic Guitar, No 5, with a Trapeze Bridge at an Op Shop in Rockhampton, Qld, Australia for $10 back in 2000.
I finally had it restored and picked it up last week (January 2014). Let me just say this...WOW!! The tone, the weight, the feel, everything, just fantastic!
Despite my research on Google and Ebay, cannot find this particular guitar and I'm intrigued how many actually exist today?
Miss Gertrude.

Richard Gibson said...

Hi all I just picked up a Suzuki steel string guitar that has a model number av-25 I've looked everywhere on the internet to find out how old it is but no luck . Can anyone help me out. Thanks Richard

Richard Zimmer said...

I Picked up a Suzuki #12, serial # 650220, Nagoya Japan. With original soft vinyl case. Pretty much a 10-, I think they are the original strings. The head has "Suzuki" in gold decal, cursive font, not bold type, sloping up hill. The neck seems thinner. Sound box is all light brown wood, with a very nice bead of white, and a nice mother of pearl and ebony inlays around the sound hole I think the serial # probably would be the 220th guitar made in 1965, and not on the date of Feb, 20, 1965, otherwise, they would only be making 1 guitar per day, which does not seem very profitable for a guitar manufacturing company, any thoughts on that from anyone? .

ackid59 said...

I have a '77 w-300 I got for $200 for my 21st birthday. I'm 55 years old now and the biggest compliment I get is when fellow musicians at open mics come up and ask what Brand it is. Sound, tonal quality and just overall quality make this guitar my 'keeper'

Nethaniel Hunter said...

I was browsing through a tip-shop in Dunedin and noticed a guitar case. I asked the shop-manager how much she'd sell it to me for. She sold it to me for $10. When I got home and went to have a decent look at it, low and behold I discovered my incredibly lightweight classical Suzuki guitar! It's rather old and had some slight damage to it. But I cleaned it up, restrung her, and oh! It's incredible! the number within the circular sticker reads 700 and the serial number is 721105. What these numbers represent, I do not know. However this guitars tone is like no other, and I always get the eyebrows from musicians in-the-know. A few weeks ago I was even offered $200 for it! The thought crossed my mind, but I couldn't part with er' haha.

ackid59 said...

Nethaniel, I believe from what I have read here is that the serial number is the year, month and day on manufacture. Mine reads 77xxxx (don't recall offhand what the rest is but I got it in 78 practically new, so I'd be inclined to accept that as true.